Being born in the 90’s certainly touched the new up and coming triple-threat artist Jo’zzy aka @dopebyaccident in a special way. She’s the protégé’ of super producer Timbaland and a talented singer/songwriter/rapper. Not only is the 90’s an inspiration and influence, but a way of life for this 24 year old; whose real name is Jocelyn Donald. She says of new single “Tryna Wife”, “It’s just nostalgic music and only the beginning. Some of today’s R&B and Hip-Hop can be so watered down and cookie-cutter, but my style of music makes you think of the 90’s.”


"They only get to see a certain part of your life and it’s not even fifty percent. It may be about fifteen percent of your life that these people are getting to watch so that’s never a good thing because you become this fifteen percent of what people get to see and there’s way more to most of us that are on that show..."  ~Bambi


“One thing I feel that happens a lot on the urban side of music, not as much on the mainstream pop side of music is that if artists don't come out for a few years, we forget that we loved them. This was not just some song I liked, but this was my favorite group in the world. I feel like the urban audience, we don't hold our stars up like the pop audience do. Their stars will put out an album tomorrow and it will still be double, triple, quadruple platinum…”  
~Brandon Casey of Jagged Edge 


Are you a fan of good 90’s music? A fan of music that allows you to still leave something to the imagination? Then you might want to cop that new Hi-Five The EP. Yes, that’s right—Billy, Faruq, Marcus, Shannon and Treston aka Hi-5 are making a comeback and Billy Covington and Faruq Evans assured Parlé Magazine in a recent interview, that they’re here to stay!


You've probably been a fan of Rico Love for years and didn't even know it. He has penned and produced chart topping hits for Usher, Keri Hilson, Fantasia, Chris Brown and Beyoncé to name a few. His EP, Discrete Luxury, was released late in 2013 and includes six new tracks including hit singles "They Don't Know" and "B*tches be Like." The EP serves as the prelude this debut album, Turn the Lights On, which is also the singer/songwriter’s memorable catch phrase. While Rico has made a name for himself mostly behind the scenes, the new record is his chance to not only expand his repertoire but show and prove that he has what it takes as a solo artist.


Kareem Nelson, didn’t tell the typical childhood story I expected to hear in a recent interview with the Wheelchairs Against Guns (W.A.G.) founder. He described a great childhood, a mother that provided everything he wanted and needed, if not more. As an only child, he said he had the best of everything, but the “streets” were still calling. “I chose the streets,” Nelson admitted. There was a sense of brotherhood and freedom that led him to the lifestyle that so many of our young Black men follow. Fast money, cars and women is the name of the game and where so many get caught up. For twelve years Nelson was about that life, until one night everything changed.


 
 

 

 

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Meet the Grammy Award Winning Producer behind hits like “Whatever You Like,” “Lollipop,” and many more!

 

Jim Jonsin is a man with a family and a point of view. Over the course of our interview, he gave his opinion on almost everything, from drum machines and Led Zeppelin samples, to how he wished he could be Quincy Jones for a day. But the difference between him and every other vanity injected member of the hip hop community is, while he may have something to say about everything, that doesn’t mean he thinks it needs to be said.

Starting out as a DJ in the late 80’s Miami club scene, Jonsin was an up and coming producer looking for his big break. Making a name for himself at an early age, (he’s been DJing since he was 14) Jonsin’s path to musical success seemed quite clear cut. By 18, he helped start up an independent label with Mass Jam Productions, called Cut It Up Def Records, and not long after that, he produced one of the labels first singles, appropriately titled “Cut it up.” The record was a success, getting spins at every nightclub in Miami, and played out of Florida low riders with almost Chronic like frequency. After it sold 40,000 copies the parent record company saw it as only natural for him to continue. Shortly after, he released another single “Party Time” on which he produced, and rapped. As another regional success in the Florida area, it was enough to get him a deal from Heat Wave Records, a smaller independent label based in Santa Barbara, California. There he adopted the moniker “Jealous J” and captained the release of a compilation album of Miami bass songs, (again literally titled) Miami Bass Jams. This compilation record saw much of the success of the first two singles and ended up certified Gold. The success of the album put him in a position to go on tour with artists such as Cypress Hill, 2 Live Crew and Markie Mark and the Funky Bunch…success seemed eminent.

But the ecstasy of triumph had to come to an end at some point, and after finishing the tour, Jonsin’s relevance went rapidly downhill and he was forced to work in relative obscurity for several years, into the early nineties. Producing more Miami bass records, and creating a new, ill advised label through Warner Brothers, Jim Jonsin was becoming musically trapped. He was still doing the same kind of stuff he used to, and the lack of evolution allowed in his music, coupled with the economic difficulty of his label bringing in next to no money, forced him to make his musical career more of his musical hobby. He was forced to work odd jobs to pay the bills (during our interview he cited one particularly bad one at Sears Department Store) and with time short, money low, and connections becoming few and far between, his profitability in the music business was becoming perpetually more unlikely. But having talent, and a good work ethic usually comes through, and in 1998, Trick Daddy offered to sign him to his Atlantic run label, Slip-n-Slide Records. This turned out to be all the help Mr. Jonsin would need because, if you’ve noticed any continuous pattern throughout all the entropy and disorder of Jim Jonsin's very up, down, and back up career, it’s that he did everything essentially by himself, with nothing but clothes on his back and the turntable at his fingers.

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